Best of the Web

Best of the Week 9/28

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Our favorite picks for the week of September 28!

TAKE A BREAK FROM WHATEVER YOU’RE DOING AND CHECK OUT OUR PICKS FOR THIS WEEK’S BEST CONTENT ON THE WEB!

THE U.N EATS TRASH FOR LUNCH AS FOOD WASTE TAKES CENTER STAGE

Lunch at the United Nations was made from food that would have otherwise found itself in a landfill halfway across the world.

 The “landfill lunch” was served to about 30 world leaders at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit on Sunday, including French President Francois Hollande, Peruvian President Ollanta Humala and U.N. secretary-general Ban Ki-moon. Read more.
via Mashable
via Mashable
via Twitter @UN_Spokesperson
via Twitter @UN_Spokesperson

 

GARDEN STATE IS WASTING ITS WASTE, SHOULD BETTER UTILIZE BIOMASS, REPORT SAYS

More than 4 million tons of New Jersey’s biomass — fuel derived from organic materials like plants and waste — could be used to produce electricity or propel transportation each year.

The bulk of the biomass (72 percent) is produced directly by the state’s population, typically in the form of municipal garbage, according to an assessment by Rutgers University’s New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. Continue reading the story here.

via njsspotlight.com
via njsspotlight.com

 

CAMBRIDGESHIRE WEDDING GUESTS ENJOY RECYCLED MEAL  

A passionate food waste campaigner treated her wedding guests to a “risky” meal with a difference – whatever the supermarkets threw out.

Zoe Chambers, 29, from Cambridgeshire, volunteers for charity FoodCycle, which collects fresh waste produce from shops for community meals. Continue reading.

Guests were served roasted vegetables and panzanella salad, with beef provided by the couple. BBC
Guests were served roasted vegetables and panzanella salad, with beef provided by the couple. BBC

 

THIS TRACTOR RUNS ON BS — BUT IT’S THE REAL, ECO-FRIENDLY DEAL 

Little do college students know, but their late-night scientific observation of a burst of methane flatulence kissed by the flame of a match may be the innovation that saves us all from climate change catastrophe. That conversion of food to gas could truly curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Around the world, farmers are installing anaerobic digesters. These digesters ferment manure and plants into biomethane. Many farmers use the fuel for heating homes and buildings, selling their excess to local grids. Soon, however, many European farmers hope to fuel their machinery via anaerobic digestion, making themselves greener and fuel-independent. Continue reading.

Via Grist.org
Via Grist.org

 

WASTE IN, ELECTRICITY OUT: THE POWER OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

Waste goes in, out comes…electricity? Waste-to-energy is an old idea. But less common are methods that harness the power of nature so masterfully that they can be brought anywhere, be it off the grid or in the city. If that weren’t enough, such methods cut carbon emissions, reducing the contributions of human-induced climate change. Continue reading.

Dominic Ebenbichler/Reuters
Dominic Ebenbichler/Reuters

 

 

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